Arctic Bay on a calm summer day - Ron Elliott
Arctic Bay on a calm summer day. - Ron Elliott
Arctic Bay in the fall time - Ron Elliott
Arctic Bay in the fall time - Ron Elliott
Arctic Bay in the winter time - Ron Elliott
Arctic Bay in the winter time - Ron Elliott

Welcome to the Arctic Bay Place Name Atlas

The Cybercartographic Atlas of Arctic Bay is an online, community-based atlas project to engage youth and Elders of Arctic Bay, Nunavut in researching, documenting, and representing their multi-faceted spatial knowledge. It involves a partnership between Nunavut Youth Consulting, the Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre (GCRC) at Carleton University, and Nunavut Arctic College.

The Atlas includes an interactive spoken map of Inuktitut place names in the Arctic Bay Region. These place names are spoken by local Inuktitut speakers. The Atlas also includes an interactive map of the 2008 Nunavut Quest, an annual inter-community dog sled that begins in Igloolik and ends in Arctic Bay.

Arctic Bay is called Ikpiarjuk — "the pocket" — because of the high hills that surround the almost landlocked bay. Arctic Bay is located on Borden Peninsula, a rolling undulating plateau dissected by numerous river valleys. In the northern part of the peninsula, where the Hamlet is located, mountains reach as high as 1,300 metres. Flat-topped King George V Mountain dominates the view to the southeast from the community. As you look southward from the Hamlet toward Adams Sound, Uluksan Point is on your right, while Holy Cross Point is at the end of the long peninsula to your left.

Terrestrial wildlife around Arctic Bay is minimal. In the last few years, caribou have come close to the community, but sightings are more common farther south near Admiralty Inlet. Polar bears frequent the area. Narwhals frequent the waters and occasionally come into Arctic Bay itself. Narwhals are hunted for their ivory tusk and maktaaq. Walrus are often seen in western Admiralty Inlet.

The Hamlet of Arctic Bay developed as a result of government housing initiatives in the 1960s. Arctic Bay is noted for miniature ivory carvings, traditional clothing and other arts and crafts.

The largest employer is the Hamlet, followed by the school and the Housing Association. The Hunters and Trappers Association manages local harvesting issues and participates in wildlife management initiatives, regionally and Nunavut wide. It also operates the sport hunts in Arctic Bay.